What is Esophagoscopy?

Esophagoscopy is the procedure done to examine the esophagus using an esophagoscope, which is a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing. Esophagoscopes may also have a tool for taking samples of tissue to be checked further under a microscope for any signs of disease.

Effects of Esophagoscopy

Esophagoscopy is used to determine specific causes of ambiguous symptoms like manifestations of acid reflux; inflammation of the esophagus or esophagitis; esophageal stricture or the narrowing of the esophagus; and obstructions of the esophagus among others. This procedure is also used for diagnosing other conditions as well.

Candidates for Esophagoscopy

Esophagoscopy is best for those that need diagnosis and/or treatment of certain conditions of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract.

Your Consultation

During your consultation, you will be advised to not eat anything at least 8 hours before the procedure. Also, the injection of a drug that slows down peristalsis is prohibited because that causes the X-rays to blur.

The Esophagoscopy Procedure

Esophagoscopy is done by placing the esophagoscope slowly down through the mouth and into the esophagus. The purpose is basically to look for any abnormalities that may be causing difficulty in breathing, swallowing or feeding.

Recovery

After the esophagoscopy, the patient may have a dry or sore throat. Provide the patient with lots of water to relieve discomfort. Any kind of coughing should be mild and will go away after some time. Should there be any serious changes or should the symptoms increase, the patient should go back to the hospital and call the Otolaryngology or Ear, nose, and throat (ENT) doctor immediately.

Risks

Esophagoscopy has very little risks involved. The most major being the perforation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.

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FAQs

What is an esophagoscope?

An esophagoscope is a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing. Esophagoscopes also have a tool for taking samples of tissue to be checked further under a microscope for any signs of disease.

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When is upper endoscopy used for treatment?

Esophagoscopy can be used as a treatment tool for stretching narrowed areas; removing benign growths; treating bleeding; and retrieving swallowed objects.

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Is the esophagoscopy painful?

Esophagoscopy should be virtually painless. Local anesthetic may be used, although the urge to gag when the endoscope goes down on the esophagus cannot be stopped.

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Are there possible complications in this procedure?

Esophagoscopy risks happen rarely and include bleeding and puncture of the stomach or intestinal wall. Minor problems like sore throat, bloating, and cramping usually disappear within the same day of the procedure.

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